Interviews

Uncategorized

Five Years in the Making

Friends, tonight Writers and Words celebrates its fifth anniversary. This is big. For five years, we have scheduled readings featuring local and regional writers—some seasoned and some making their debut appearance. We’ve have countless wildcards—some wilder than others—and a couple unexpected turns along the way.

There were a lot of different ideas we kicked around for the five year celebration—some grand with a ticket price in the hopes of fundraising, some small and intimate just with the writers who have read for free for us over the years, and some simple like the line-up we landed on: an open mic to feature you—the supporters who have kept this thing going—at the place where this all started, Blue Pit BBQ and Whiskey Bar.

Five years ago, give or take a few days, Michelle Junot roped Michael Tager to organize a reading to help her sell her thesis book (because she thought she could sell enough books to pay off her student loans. Being young and naïve is cute sometimes, and so sad other times.) That first night we had four readers—Michelle Junot, nonfiction; Michael Tager, fiction; Steven Leyva, poetry; and Anne Marie, our first wildcard. The entire evening was emceed and lit by Ian Anderson. If we had known that this would be the first reading of a series that would become Baltimore’s best (and let’s face it, W&W is Baltimore’s best), we might have taken more pictures.

Michelle didn’t sell any books that night, and she’s still paying off those student loans, but Writers and Words has grown into something she and the rest of the folks in attendance that night could never have imagined. Although the two founders and the original crew have moved to the sidelines, the series continues to thrive due to the time and dedication of two individuals: Cija Jefferson and Maria Goodson. And our banners and zines are of course made possible by the one and only Amanda Ponder.

But ultimately, we are successful, because of you. The yous who are reading this. The yous who rush over after work to catch a reading, even when it’s hot, or cold, or raining, or incredibly beautiful outside and you could be doing anything else but listening to a brand new writer find her voice. The yous who come up to the editors after the reading to say thank you or hi. The yous who continue to make this a joy.

Thank you for five years, Baltimore. Join us tonight and let us hear your words at our open mic. Details available here.

Until next year…

–The Entire Writers and Words Team

 

Advertisements
Uncategorized

5 Burning Questions with Cameron MacKenzie

Cameron MacKenzie is one of our featured writers at our September 10th reading. Check out our interview with her below.

What is your first memory of writing for fun?

I remember in 3rd grade writing a story about a dog who could fly and had X-ray vision. The reason it sticks with me is that I got really frustrated about the ending, and couldn’t figure out how to bring the story home. Probably because it was around 1984, I decided the dog should go to the Olympics and win a gold medal. That felt a little rushed to me, a little forced, but looking back we most likely had something like 30 minutes for the whole assignment.

How many drafts = done?

Some stories happen quickly, some take years. For a short story, I’ll write at least 15 drafts. Usually when I think it’s completely tight and ready to go, I’ll set it aside for a month or two and then come back to it. The time gives me some necessary distance on the story and I can see problems I didn’t notice before. I’ll do anything to get some space between myself and the writing; I’ll look at the story in a different font or with different spacing. I usually know the story’s done when I just cut off the first page or the last page and it sounds a lot better.

What is your favorite book or favorite book-of-the-moment?

I’m back and forth between Peter Mathiessen’s The Snow Leopard, a gorgeous recounting of his hike to Himalayan monasteries in 1973, and The Largesse of the Sea Maiden, a collection of short stories by Denis Johnson–the story “Triumph Over the Grave” has got to be one of the best things I’ve ever read.

What is it about your discipline that gets you the most excited?

There’s a black magic to writing. It’s really like a conjuring–a gathering and deployment of spirits. A powerful writer can build and breathe life into a world right in front of you that wasn’t there before. It’s a remarkably difficult highwire act that, if done right, has the power to change people.

What’s your favorite word or words? What about it/them appeals to you?

I get nervous if I find myself using the same words. I love it when I stumble on something unexpected. “Disarticulated” is a word that popped up lately as I was writing. I try to listen to the rhythm of the sentence and, finding that, then try to get a sense of how many syllables the next word should have in order to keep that rhythm going, or complicate it, or shut it down.

Bonus question: what is one thing you would eradicate if you had the power to eradicate just one thing in this world.  [can you tell my favorite word is eradicate?]

Fear, maybe. All negativity comes from that. But I’m also hesitant to eradicate. Maybe we need more, in the broad sense, not less.

___

Cameron’s work has appeared or will appear in The Michigan Quarterly Review, Salmagundi, and J Journal, among other places. His novel The Beginning of His Excellent and Eventful Career (MadHat Press), and monograph Badiou and American Modernist Poetics (Palgrave Macmillan) were both published last year. He teaches at Ferrum College.

Uncategorized

5 Burning Questions with Rachel E. Hicks

Rachel E. Hicks is one of our featured writers at our September 10th reading. Check out our interview with her below.

What is your first memory of writing for fun?

All the examples that first came to mind were assignments for school—limericks, haiku, and the like. I suppose it took me a long time to give myself permission to write creatively, to play with words. I do remember one poem I wrote in either eighth or ninth grade, an epistolary poem to a loved one who had died—except that I hadn’t lost anyone I’d loved yet. I must have needed to explore what that might feel like.

How many drafts = done?

Most of my poems go through between five and ten drafts. I sit on them for a long time, coming back to them fresh after days, weeks, months, sometimes years. I revise until there is a sense that the poem is ready to head out; there is no magic or formula for this. I know if I held onto my poems and didn’t send them out, I would probably never stop revising them. Even after they’re published, I still sometimes want to keep tweaking them.

What is your favorite book or favorite book-of-the-moment?

I’m going to have to go with favorite book-of-the-moment…too many all-time favorites. I’ve been doing a deep dive into the life and work of Czeslaw Milosz this year and have been feasting on his Selected Poems: 1931–2004. In the anthology A Book of Luminous Things, Milosz curated international poems he felt embodied his view that “poetry is…on the side of being and against nothingness.”

What is it about your discipline that gets you the most excited?

Beauty and truth in good poetry knock me flat. What logical sense does it make that a moment of deep beauty—in a line of verse, for example—is enough for the soul, is so mysteriously healing? I’ve read poetry that somehow balances the scales when all does not seem right with the world. I’m not sure how it does that. I get excited when I read that kind of poetry, or when something that I’ve written flares out at someone in that way.

What’s your favorite word or words? What about it/them appeals to you?

Singular. This word helps me be attentive to the person (or moment) in front of me, whether in real life or on the page. Paying attention helps me to wonder (as in awe). The word singular reminds me not to pre-judge, but to look for what is unique in a person, character, or situation.

Lately I’ve been reading Marilynne Robinson’s collection of essays, The Givenness of Things. As a result, I’m enjoying exploring the word (and concept of) ontology. I’m not into abstract metaphysics, but, like Robinson, I believe there is meaning to being—to the things that are. I agree with her that there are some “givens” we can grasp and intuit based on who we are as humans. As a writer, I’m curious about being and meaning and how they are related.

Bonus question: what is one thing you would eradicate if you had the power to eradicate just one thing in this world.  [can you tell my favorite word is eradicate?]

Plastics.

___

Rachel E. Hicks’s poetry has appeared in Little Patuxent Review, Welter, St. Katherine Review, Gulf Stream, and other journals. She won the 2019 Briar Cliff Review annual fiction contest, and her poems have been finalists in other poetry contests. A global nomad who has lived in seven countries, she explores themes of displacement, worldview, and connection in her writing. Some of her favorite things: scooters, Sichuan food, and hiking. Find her online at rachelehicks.com.

Uncategorized

5 Burning Questions with Carolyn Shayte

Carolyn Shayte is one of our featured writers at our September 10th reading. Check out our interview with her below.

What is your first memory of writing for fun?

I must have been around 5, I remember writing my own version of an Arthur storybook, one of my favorite series to read as a kid, complete with hand-drawn illustrations by yours truly. I even stapled all the pages together and made a front and back cover out of cardboard so it looked more like a real book. I was so proud of this, I think I still have it somewhere!

How many drafts = done?

That’s a tough question! I think all my writing needs at least a couple drafts, and some pieces need more drafts than others, but then I also have to stop myself from overworking pieces as well. So I think I determine more by my gut, when that is telling me the piece is done (or done enough for the time being!).

What is your favorite book or favorite book-of-the-moment?

My favorite book would have to be a collection of poetry by Mary Oliver. I find myself returning to it over and over again.

What is it about your discipline that gets you the most excited?

I enjoy how interdisciplinary all the different mediums I like to work in can be. This allows me flexibility to express myself in a variety of ways, and allows multiple access points to the viewer/audience.

What’s your favorite word or words? What about it/them appeals to you?

I don’t know if I have one favorite word, but I love alliterations and repetition of sounds. The whimsical way words weave together works wonders for me.

Bonus question: what is one thing you would eradicate if you had the power to eradicate just one thing in this world.  [can you tell my favorite word is eradicate?]

Great question! I would eradicate the continued stigma around mental health. I have seen firsthand how many folks do not get the support and help they need for their own mental health. I hope to eradicate some of this stigma through my future work as a counselor and art therapist.

___

Carolyn Shayte is a writer, artist, teacher, and PowerPoint enthusiast living and working in Baltimore, MD. Her work has been published in The Poetry and Fiction Issue of Baltimore City Paper, The Purple Poetry Book, and HYRSTERIA, among others. She will begin her M.A. in Art Therapy and Counseling at Southwestern College and the New Earth Institute in Santa Fe, New Mexico this upcoming January 2020.

Uncategorized

5 Burning Questions With Michelle Elvy

Michelle Elvy is one of our featured writers at our August 13th reading. Check out our interview with her below.

What is your first memory of writing for fun?

We were a family of storytellers. As a kid, I wrote and then performed plays with friends or my brothers for the family. They were sometimes adaptations of fairy tales, sometimes made up. I also wrote radio plays with a friend. We recorded them on our small tape deck and roared at how funny we were. I do not know where those tapes are today, but it’s likely a good thing they are lost.

How many drafts = done?

As many as it takes. As an editor and manuscript assessor, I’ve worked with many different kinds of writers, and it’s clear that every piece and every writer will require a different framework (including time) for editing. Sometimes the polishing goes quickly – but sometimes there is deeper work to do, once you step back and look at the whole. I enjoy this process immensely – for me, it’s not a list of tasks that need to be done but part of the creative process. Usually, in the editing phrases, something new emerges. One can be continually surprised at what is lurking beneath the surface, waiting to come out. For my new book, the everrumble, I did not set out to write it all as a whole, though I did write a set of connected stories mostly within a one-month period of time. Then it took more than a year to let it sit, to walk away and come back – and to see how the pieces fit together and formed the story. It was a really wonderful experience because I did not feel rushed about it.

What is your favorite book or favorite book-of-the-moment?

Hmmm. Tough question. I go back to certain authors again and again: Ondaatje, Proulx, Barth, Didion. Also Nathalie Saurraute’s Tropisms. Michael Ende’s Momo is a classic that is a family favorite – our boat (our home since 2003) is named after that character. If I have to name one book that I value more each time I read it, it’s John Barth’s Tidewater Tales. It is complex and layered, critical and intelligent – and yet ultimately joyful.

What is it about your discipline that gets you the most excited?

If we are talking about short form writing (flash fiction, prose poetry, etc.), it’s seeing something small and sculpted into just the right shape. This goes for my own writing as well as the work I read as an editor. I think small fictions, like poetic writing, can work as a tool for any writing. The small form also encourages experimentation – and that is really exciting.

What’s your favorite word or words? What about it/them appeals to you?

I am going to answer this with an excerpt from my new book – because the character Zettie is a person who stops talking in order to listen. She tunes into the sounds of the earth, and words. This is from a chapter called ‘Book Notes’:

… she began collecting book notes as
she read, adding to her first entry and crowding her
little book with letters that fascinated her. As her
knowledge of languages grew, she kept one book
that had special notations – the ones she pulled
out repeatedly. There was Little Tiger, catching
two fish so that he might eat one and put the other
back – a gift of life, and such joy (Janosch, Post
für den Tiger); and arguments about truth and
perception (Flaubert/ Nadeau). Also proverbs such
as giza likizidi, kucha kunakaribia – when darkness
becomes more intense, dawn is near: useful in many
applications.

In the margins of the pages, she also developed
the habit of adding phrases she turned in her mind,
over and over; phrases like Man lernt nie aus
(German, you never stop learning); Fingertoppskänsla
(Swedish, finger tips moving, or intuitively thinking)
and Hapana bahari isiyo mawimbi (Kiswahili, there
is no sea without waves).
And this, her favourite word: levande ljus (Swedish),
for candle. Living light.

Bonus question: what literary character do you think would come across as really appealing and not appealing on an online dating profile? Think about what they would write about themselves online (would Mr. Darcy write nice things about himself?).

Momo – she is an odd girl with a wonderful mind and big heart. The right person would have to come along to ‘get’ her.

___

Michelle Elvy is a writer, editor and manuscript assessor. She is Assistant Editor for the international Best Small Fictions series and founder of Flash Frontier: An Adventure in Short Fiction and National Flash Fiction Day NZ. In 2018 she co-edited Bonsai: Best small stories from Aotearoa New Zealand. Michelle’s poetry, fiction, travel writing, creative nonfiction and reviews have been widely published and anthologized, most recently in The Feminine Divine (Cynren Press 2019), New Micro (W.W. Norton 2018), Ofi Press (2016-2018), Manifesto: 101 Political Poems from Aotearoa New Zealand (Otago University Press 2017) and Borderlands & Crossroads: Writing the Motherland (Demeter Press 2016). Her new book, the everrumble (Ad Hoc Fiction 2019), is a small novel in small forms. michelleelvy.com

Uncategorized

5 burning questions with Marlene Trestman

Marlene Trestman is one of our featured writers at our August 13th reading. Check out our interview with her below.

What is your first memory of writing for fun?

For me, to be honest, writing has never been “fun.” It has been deeply rewarding, a source of personal pride, and indeed one of the tools of my trade as a lawyer, but it has always involved hard work compounded by self-doubt. Holding a copy of my first book for the first time? Now, that was fun.

How many drafts = done?

I can’t answer this question with a number of drafts, but I can tell you that excluding the numerous online drafts that were never printed, just the printed versions of draft chapters for my first book, Fair Labor Lawyer, fill a large banker’s box. The best description of my writing process is food-themed: I start out with a huge pot of watery, bland, broth which I keep cooking, seasoning, and reducing until it blends into a bowl of thick, rich, gumbo.

What is your favorite book or favorite book-of-the-moment?

For the book I am currently writing, I keep nearby Isabel Wilkerson’s The Warmth of Other Suns. Not only a literary masterpiece, it sets a gold standard on how to transform a mountain of interviews and archival research about six decades of complex American history into a beautiful narrative by telling the deeply moving stories of a few principal subjects.

What is it about your discipline that gets you the most excited?

I love the research (often accompanied by long hours digging through documents in distant archives) that necessarily goes into non-fiction writing. I enjoy the thrill of the hunt as much as the ultimate satisfaction of figuring out a difficult puzzle.

What’s your favorite word or words? What about it/them appeals to you?

“Wordsmithery” is a favorite of mine. It’s such a wonderful set of syllables that precisely identifies the skill of finding the correct words and putting them together in a pleasing and purposeful way.

“Feminist” is also a great word for me simply because of its seemingly relentless power to generate controversy. Some of the world’s greatest feminists refused, or only reluctantly allowed themselves, to be identified as such.

___

Marlene Trestman: Former Maryland Assistant Attorney General Marlene Trestman retired from her 30-year law practice to write the biography of her trailblazing mentor, Fair Labor Lawyer: The Remarkable Life of New Deal Attorney and Supreme Court Advocate Bessie Margolin (LSU Press, 2016). Inspired by Margolin’s childhood and her own, Trestman is now writing her second non-fiction book, Most Fortunate Unfortunates: New Orleans’s Jewish Orphans’ Home, 1855-1946 (LSU Press, forthcoming). More information at www.marlenetrestman.com.

Uncategorized

5 burning questions with Israfel Sivad

Israfel Sivad is one of our featured writers at our  August 13th reading. Check out our interview with him below.

What is your first memory of writing for fun?

My first memory of writing for fun was all the way back in 1984. I was only seven years old. I’d just seen Return of the Jedi in theaters, and I was so sad the Star Wars saga was over. I dug up a wide-ruled notebook my mother had given me, and I started writing a sequel to the original Star Wars trilogy. I never finished the project, but I was so proud of it. My favorite line was: “Boom! Boom!” went the rebel guns. “Grrrr!” said Chewie.

How many drafts = done?

As many as it takes. Sometimes, I feel a poem is done as soon as I’ve finished the first draft. In other instances, I might have to rework the lines over and over again until I’m able to say precisely what I intend. I have no hard and fast rule. Sometimes, I’ll spend a whole day crafting a poem. Other times, it will take more than one sitting. The poem is done once changes start making it lose its vitality. I’ll usually work something until I look at it and say, “That’s overworked.” Then, I start stripping things back away to return to the heart of what I wanted to say.

What is your favorite book or favorite book-of-the-moment?

My favorite book of the moment would have to be James Joyce’s Ulysses. It’s very much the book I’ve always wanted to write – a slice of life story that contains a whole world of metaphor and symbolism. In my opinion, it makes the argument that mythology exists in our day to day existences. We simply have to know what we’re looking for.

What is it about your discipline that gets you the most excited?

I love discovering the structure of a poem. Words are simply words until you fit them into a structure. Then, those words begin forming a poem. Some of the structures I use are based on classical motifs. Others, I invent solely for the poems I’ve written. I’ve used mathematical formulas, random generators and pure inspiration to come up with structures. But every poem I write has a very strict structure, and I love trying to fit words into those. The most exciting part is when the structure reveals itself as somehow relating to the content. That’s when I feel like I’m really in a groove, when the form and content merge together so that I no longer see one without the other.

What’s your favorite word or words? What about it/them appeals to you?

Wow, this is a tough one. I haven’t had a favorite word in over a decade, and back then it was always a profanity. I loved the sound of profanities, the shock of power a sound could convey. I never believed in profanity. I believe words are only words. They have no power outside of context, and the amount of meanings that a word life “fuck” or “shit” could have is mindboggling. They can be positive or negative, violent or peaceful, all depending on context. But they’re almost always somewhat shocking.

Bonus question:what literary character do you think would come across as really appealing and not appealing on an online dating profile? Think about what they would write about themselves online (would Mr. Darcy write nice things about himself?).

One character who I think could make himself come across as very appealing in an online dating profile (although, dating him would be a whole other story) is Nikolai Stavrogin from Dostoevsky’s novel Demons. He could easily describe himself in a manner that sounds very appealing – interested in the high and lofty things in life, independently wealthy, privately educated, and he probably would do just that. Simply so he could get the satisfaction of having another person be into him. Then, he’d probably make a charming first impression with his good looks and honesty, but he’d also cheat on his partner and not respect his or her feelings. In fact, he may treat somebody horribly just to get some sort of twisted satisfaction out of seeing how they might respond. Definitely not the person you want to be dating… as inviting as he may appear at a first glance.

___

Israfel Sivad is a Washington, DC area-based poet and writer. He is the founder of Ursprung Collective and the lyricist for indie rock group One & the Many. His writing is known for offering cryptic commentaries on human nature, heavy with references to contemporary culture and mythology. His most recent collection of poetry, We Are the Underground, was released in November of 2018.